Divas, Disrupters, Destroyers and the Disengaged Seminar

How much of your time is spent dealing with difficult employees? A recent article quoted that an average of 57% of a managers time is spent handling employee issues.  Come join us on Tuesday October 15th to learn effective ways to address your Divas, Disrupters, Destroyers and the Disengaged.  Don’t be held hostage by employees that bring value, and yet get away with destructive behaviors costing you productivity, profitability and peace of mind.

Jody Bagno-DillOur speaker Jody Bagno-Dill, is the founder and CEO of Jazz Business Consulting, a firm specializing in the development and implementation of strategy geared for growth.  She consults and coaches Owners, CEOs and Senior-level management on reducing the drama and distrust that hurts workplace culture and impact.

 

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Health Care Reform: What Employers Need to Know Now

Last year, the United States Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, the sweeping health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010.  Many of the most important provisions of the law were scheduled to become effective in 2014, but recent developments have delayed implementation of rules, including the much publicized “play or pay” provision.  This Advisory updates employers on some of the key elements of the Affordable Care Act. Continue reading “Health Care Reform: What Employers Need to Know Now”

Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?

Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?

On June 26, 2013, in United States v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court found unconstitutional Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”).  Section 3 of DOMA prohibited the federal government from acknowledging marriages between same-sex spouses. Following Windsor, the federal government may no longer distinguish between same-sex and opposite-sex marriages; however, Windsor does not require individual states to acknowledge same-sex marriage and states presently appear free to define marriage as they wish.  At the time of the Windsor ruling, twelve states and the District of Columbia recognized same-sex marriages.[1]  Because the definition of “spouse” and “marriage” impact a variety of human resource issues, including, FMLA obligations, COBRA continuation coverage, consents to beneficiary designations in 401(k) plans, and other employee benefit plan coverage issues, the Windsor ruling left many unanswered questions for employers. Continue reading “Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?”