2017 California Employment Law Update

2017 may prove to be a pivotal year for employment law in California following an historical election year. Please join us for our annual 2017 California Employment Law Update provided by Michael Brewer from Littler as he presents a lively look at the effects, positive and negative of recent litigation, legislative agency trends as well as an exploration of labor and employment law topics impacting California employers of all sizes, such as:

  • Election Day – Implications in the workplace
  • Are you ready for the new White Collar exemption rules?
  • What does “equal pay for similar work” mean?
  • Preventing workplace violence in the age of the “active shooter”
  • Marijuana in California – how should employers navigate this new legislation?
  • Legislation and litigation updates

Location:
The seminar is on January 24, 2017 at the Clarion Hotel, 1050 Burnett Ave, Concord, CA and includes a breakfast buffet.

Click HERE to register online.

About our speaker:

Michael Brewer
Michael Brewer

Michael E. Brewer practices exclusively in the area of labor and employment law, defending employers in cases, including class and collective actions, that involve:

  • Wage and hour claims
  • Alleged sexual harassment
  • Discrimination
  • Retaliation
  • Wrongful termination
  • Employment-related torts

Michael regularly appears in state and federal courts and before various governmental agencies including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Department of Labor, the Department of Labor Standards Enforcement, the Employment Development Department, and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

For more information about Mr. Brewer click here for his corporate profile.

Click HERE to register online.

Health Care Reform: What Employers Need to Know Now

Last year, the United States Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act, the sweeping health care law enacted by Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010.  Many of the most important provisions of the law were scheduled to become effective in 2014, but recent developments have delayed implementation of rules, including the much publicized “play or pay” provision.  This Advisory updates employers on some of the key elements of the Affordable Care Act. Continue reading “Health Care Reform: What Employers Need to Know Now”

Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?

Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?

On June 26, 2013, in United States v. Windsor, the United States Supreme Court found unconstitutional Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”).  Section 3 of DOMA prohibited the federal government from acknowledging marriages between same-sex spouses. Following Windsor, the federal government may no longer distinguish between same-sex and opposite-sex marriages; however, Windsor does not require individual states to acknowledge same-sex marriage and states presently appear free to define marriage as they wish.  At the time of the Windsor ruling, twelve states and the District of Columbia recognized same-sex marriages.[1]  Because the definition of “spouse” and “marriage” impact a variety of human resource issues, including, FMLA obligations, COBRA continuation coverage, consents to beneficiary designations in 401(k) plans, and other employee benefit plan coverage issues, the Windsor ruling left many unanswered questions for employers. Continue reading “Same-Sex Spouses—What Does This Mean for Employers?”